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Difference Between IEEE 802.11ah and 802.11af in the IoT

Traditional Wi-Fi technology, or IEEE standard 802.11, provides wireless connectivity ideal for short-range applications where the communicating devices are plugged in. However, these are not ideal circumstances for many Internet of Things (IoT) applications that demand both longer signal distances and lower power consumption for battery-operated gadgets.

Two relatively recent versions of the IEEE standard are 802.11ah or HaLow, and 802.11af or White-Fi. Learn more about these standards and how either one of them could be the solution to your next IoT design.

Radio Wave Frequency & Signal Range

An important concept to understand when adopting a wireless standard is that lower-frequency signals travel further than higher-frequency signals. For instance, 802.11ad (WiGig) operates at 60 gigahertz (GHz) for speeds up to 7 Gigabits per second (Gb/s), but with a range limited to about 10 meters. On the other hand, 802.11ac operates in the 2.4- or 5-GHz bands with speeds of more than 1.3 Gb/s and a range of about 100 meters.

If you have an IoT application with a signal distance requirement of 100 meters or greater, and you hope for lower power consumption, you may benefit from adopting the 802.11ah or 802.11af standard.

What Is 802.11ah (HaLow)?

HaLow is a sophisticated wireless technology. While it has yet to be widely adopted, it’s still worth considering for new IoT projects.

  • Frequency: 802.11ah uses frequencies below 1 GHz—specifically in the 902 to 928 megahertz (MHz) spectrum—to achieve low power consumption ideal for battery-operated applications.
  • Signal distance: Operating on a low frequency means the wireless signal travels further. Most Wi-Fi gear has a maximum range of 100 meters under ideal conditions, but HaLow can connect devices up to 1 km apart with the right antenna.
  • Data rate: The 902 to 928 MHz spectrum is divided into 1-, 2-, 4-, 6-, and 16-MHz channels. Data rates of up to 100 kilobits per second (kb/s) are possible in a 1-MHz channel, and up to several hundred Megabits per second (Mb/s) are easily achieved in a 16-MHz channel.
  • Power consumption: The primary accomplishment with HaLow is its low power consumption. Shortened contention access procedures and short data packets minimize transmit time and power usage. Typical user stations feature a sleep mode to conserve battery life even further.

What Is 802.11af (White-Fi)?

Also known as Super Wi-Fi, White-Fi is meant for long-range, non-line-of-sight data transmission. Unlike 802.11ah, it isn’t part of the Wi-Fi Alliance family, and few operating networks have been implemented thus far.

  • Frequency: White-Fi utilizes the unused TV channels from 54 to 698 MHz.
  • Signal distance: The range depends on the frequency. Signals closer to 698 MHz can travel about 3 km, while signals transmitted closer to 54 MHz have even longer ranges.
  • Data rate: The 54 to 698 MHz spectrum is divided into 6-, 7-, and 8-MHz channels. A maximum data rate of 24 Mb/s is possible in a 6-MHz channel.
  • Power consumption: With a low transmit power of just 100 milliwatts (mW) for mobile user stations and 4 watts (W) for base stations or access points, there’s ample opportunity to use battery-operated equipment communicating over White-Fi.

Gain a Foothold in the Internet of Things

Whether you decide HaLow or White-Fi is best for your IoT application, Corporate Technology Solutions can get your building, facility, or campus set up. Our team is highly trained to ensure your business is up to code and meets your precise needs.

To learn more about our innovative wireless services, please contact Corporate Technology Solutions. We have headquarters in Phoenix and Tucson to serve businesses throughout the Southwest.

 

Posted in In-Building Wireless on November 13th, 2017 · Comments Off on Difference Between IEEE 802.11ah and 802.11af in the IoT

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Li-Fi: How It Could Boost Wi-Fi

Mobile computing wouldn’t be what it is today without Wi-Fi. This technology has made it possible for employees to access corporate networks from anywhere and has transformed libraries and coffee shops into offices for telecommuters.

Unfortunately, Wi-Fi has its shortcomings:

  • It has a limited reach, especially when walls are concerned.
  • It’s notorious for security breaches.
  • Multiple users can overwhelm an access point with limited bandwidth.

Li-Fi, or Light Fidelity, is one possible solution to the deficiencies of Wi-Fi networking. Here’s a more in-depth exploration of this technology and how it could boost Wi-Fi when it hits the market one day.

What Is Li-Fi?

This up-and-coming wireless protocol has exciting potential. It uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) to provide wireless network access. With LEDs becoming the new standard for general purpose lighting in homes and businesses, the adoption of Li-Fi could be fast and seamless.

Li-Fi remains a work in progress, but it’s being developed as a complement to Wi-Fi, not a replacement. Both technologies would coexist inside Smartphones, laptops, and tablets. Once implemented, Li-Fi could improve Wi-Fi bandwidth, boost speed, increased reliability and security, and overall enhance our communication capabilities.

How Does Li-Fi Work?

LEDs on the market today feature a chip to control their light output. A built-in transmitter modulates light intensity up to millions of times per second, meaning Li-Fi could theoretically transmit data 100 times faster than Wi-Fi!

But to tap into Li-Fi technology, you would need special light bulbs. The fundamental difference between an ordinary LED bulb and a Li-Fi-enabled light is the presence of a driver circuit. This is what sends and receives wireless signals using different intensities of light, most of which are not detectable to the eye.

Some bulbs require a CAT5 cable to hook up to the network, while others can receive data over power lines. The addition of a special encoder/decoder chip in Smartphones, laptops, and tablets—or in a dongle you plug in—would allow the cameras already present in these devices to send and receive Li-Fi signals from LED lights in the room. As you walk around, the device automatically detects the strongest signal and shifts between LED bulbs to always keep the reception at full strength.

When Will Li-Fi Become Available?

The concept of Li-Fi was first introduced in 2011 at a TEDGlobal conference. Li-Fi bulbs have already been deployed in 80 test sites, and certain companies are testing Li-Fi capabilities, but details are being kept under wraps for now.

The company attempting to make Li-Fi a reality, pureLi-Fi Ltd., predicts that Smartphones and other devices with Li-Fi signal chips will begin shipping within two to three years. The co-founder of pureLi-Fi asserts that “Li-Fi is where Wi-Fi was 15 years ago, and in five to 10 years, Li-Fi will be as ubiquitous as Wi-Fi is now.”

Stay Up-to-Date with the Latest Advances in Communication Technology

Running a competitive business requires you to stay in the know about the latest advances in communication technology. Let Corporate Technology Solutions help! We report on the fascinating changes coming our way so that when they eventually hit the market, you’re more prepared to take advantage of them. This keeps your business one step ahead of your competitors.

For help upgrading your existing wireless system, or to learn more about our communication system services, please contact Corporate Technology Solutions. We’re happy to conduct a wireless site survey in your Arizona building to help you maximize your Wi-Fi network—and prepare for the possibility of Li-Fi technology hitting the market in the near future.

Posted in In-Building Wireless on October 24th, 2017 · Comments Off on Li-Fi: How It Could Boost Wi-Fi

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BYOD: What It Means for Your Business

You may be hearing trends and talks about “BYOD” and how or why businesses should prepare. At Corporate Technology Solutions, we have everything you need to know here. Read below to learn more about how you can stay prepared and ahead of the growing trend to improve your business’s efficiency and bottom line.

If you’re looking for full-service low voltage solutions for your Southwest building or company, contact us online to talk through how we can meet your needs.

What Is BYOD?

BYOD is “bring your own device” and has been a growing trend in offices across the country. This means that employees are providing their own smartphones, laptops, tablets, and wearables to integrate into their day-to-day operations in and out of the office.

Some forecast that 85% of businesses will be BYOD be 2020 (only a few years out!).

What Are the Benefits of BYOD?

BYOD can, in fact, be beneficial for employers, as it can:

  • Increase productivity
  • Improve employee satisfaction
  • Minimize adoption phrase
  • Reduce technology and hardware costs

How Does This Impact Businesses?

With benefits, however, there are areas that need attention as well.

  • Security – with employees bringing and integrating their own devices into their operation, security can be at risk, depending on the types of files and data they have access to. Business owners need to think about types of new or adjusted policies and security measures should be put in place to protect the customers or the business.
  • Network Connectivity – offices from 10 years ago could be expected to connect and support one desktop and one phone for each employee (with likely some printers or other copiers throughout the office). Now, every employee may be bringing in 3-4+ devices each that need to connect to the internet and other devices in the office. Reliable and versatile networks are a must for businesses and buildings trying to keep up with the emerging new devices and reliance on more.

How Can Low Voltage Technology Help?

With increased demand and expectation for wireless connectivity reliability and bandwidth, it’s expected that many buildings and businesses will need to upgrade their network cabling and capabilities. Luckily, low voltage solutions providers, like Corporate Technology Solutions, can help. Here are some solutions that can help buildings move beyond limited structured and stay ahead of the trend:

Improved Wireless Connectivity

Mobile data traffic has been predicted to grow by seven-fold by 2021, which will require most business owners or facility managers to greatly upgrade the wireless connectivity infrastructure in their buildings. Upgraded Wi-Fi networks can also incorporate more features for the growing BYOD device trend, including:

  • Security encryption
  • Support for increased bandwidth demand from Wi-Fi for voice calling
  • Big data insights on usage and demand
  • Device flexibility for smartphones, tablets, wearables, and laptops
  • And more

Learn more about our in-building wireless solutions offered to Southwest companies »

Distributed Antenna Systems (DAS)

Wireless signal may be integral to your business’s operation, but cellular connectivity (for 3G, 4G, and LTE devices) is also critical to your success (especially with many employees using their own smart phones and tablets in the workplace). DAS improves cellular connectivity issues and can be easily scaled with growing companies or when demand peaks during the workday. DAS is also key to overcoming many structural obstacles office buildings face (with weaker signal in stairwells, parking decks, interior conference rooms, and more).

Learn more about our DAS services offered in the Southwest »

Small Cells

Similar to distributed antenna systems, small cells are often the solution for smaller work environments at a lower employment and operation cost. Small cells improve cellular connectivity issues when offices are too congested or blocked by strong signal.

Low Voltage & Wireless Infrastructure Upgrades in the Southwest

Corporate Technology Solutions provides full in-building wireless solutions, DAS services, and infrastructure upgrades, from installation and maintenance to design and testing. We have offices in Tempe and Tucson, but can provide turnkey services throughout Arizona. Contact us to get started on improving the wireless signal strength to meet growing demand from bring-your-own or additional devices throughout your building today!

You May Be Interested In:

Why Property Owners Should Consider Enhanced DAS Before Construction Begins

Posted in DAS, In-Building Wireless on June 26th, 2017 · Comments Off on BYOD: What It Means for Your Business

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How Real Estate Owners Can Profit From an In-Building Wireless Strategy

Data demands from mobile devices are exploding and everyone expects to have high speed connectivity at all time. Do you know what the cell service is like in your property? If you receive complaints of weak signal or poor reception in certain parts of your building, it may not be the carrier’s lack of coverage, but show a clear need for an upgrade to your current approach to wireless connectivity.

Having an in-building wireless strategy, such as a Distributed Antenna Systems (DAS), is a way that many real estate owners are combatting this trend—taking the need in the industry into their own hands and improving the signals in their properties, thus increasing their perceived value by tenants, employees, and customers alike.

Treating wireless coverage like a fourth utility can be a way for you (and your properties) to compete in the new wireless world. If you do not have a comprehensive wireless strategy, you are likely missing future revenue opportunities and can end up spending excess money on multiple systems if not designed to work and scale on one infrastructure.

Keep reading below on the benefits of investing in DAS for your real estate properties, or call us today to discuss your wireless improvement needs throughout the Southwest.

Why Does Your Real Estate Property Have Poor Cell Coverage?

Many real estate owners are realizing that poor cell coverage may not just be from the carriers (like Verizon and AT&T), but may be how the building is built and structured. Higher floors can see poor cell reception and even low-E glass (found in many energy efficient residential and commercial windows) can block the signal. The structure of your building (including building materials (like concrete), layout (including parking structures and stairwells), and the number of users trying to connect can all impact how strong (or rather, more noticeably by tenants, how weak), the signal is in your buildings.

How to Add Value to Tenants with Strong Wireless Signal

Savvy real estate owners understand that investing in a DAS system makes their property more technologically desirable. As more and more people use their phones and other devices that need to connect to wireless or cellular data and expect strong, reliable service no matter where they are in the building, a property with an enhanced DAS system can be seen as a value add.

Looking for a go-to company to handle wireless upgrading in your new or existing real estate property? Corporate Technology Solutions is the name to know in the Southwest. Growing from a top tier cabling installer, we now specialize in the design and installation of many systems based on our history of voice, data, video, and fiber optic cabling systems.

Viewing Wireless Connectivity as a Fourth Utility

Current building managers have increased pressure to make their wireless connectivity (both cellular signal and Wi-Fi) reliable for their employees and customers throughout their entire buildings. And this is also a consideration for real estate owners or investors looking for toward their next purchase or build.

Wireless connectivity is important for buildings of all types, from residential apartments, to high-rise office buildings, to manufacturing plants and event centers. Even more than just phones and computers require connectivity these days—from printers to security systems and thermostats to the never-ending release of new “smart” devices.

It’s important for real estate owners to understand that tenants want full-strength, full-speed dependable wireless communication. One initial strategy for managers is simply a mental shift to viewing wireless connectivity as a fourth utility—in addition to gas, water, and electric. Employees and customers now expect strong signal in an office just as much as they’d expect working faucets and A/C or heat.

With that viewpoint, it will be installed and implemented with the intent to last a life time, rather than causing building owners the headache of upgrading to meet with increasing demands (both in terms over capacity demand and the demand for five-bar coverage throughout an entire property).

How Will DAS Improve Your Real Estate Property in the Southwest?

A Distributed Antenna System (DAS) is a network of antenna nodes that share a neutral host in order to expand a wireless network by adding coverage and capacity to a specific area or building structure. This expansion increases wireless network quality to areas notoriously difficult to hold a signal.

The network contains a central hub, which requires fiber to link to a system of nodes. The nodes can be conveniently placed on any object, such as a sign, a light, or a plant, in order to provide strong coverage everywhere within the specified area. DAS can provide improvement to Wi-Fi, 3G, 4G, and LTE services and offer a highly scalable network design to evolve further with the needs of your property.

We have offices in Tempe and Tucson, but can provide DAS system design, installation, integration, and maintenance services throughout Arizona. Contact us to get started on improving the signal strength throughout your real estate property and increasing the value you provide to your tenants!

Posted in DAS, In-Building Wireless on November 18th, 2016 · Comments Off on How Real Estate Owners Can Profit From an In-Building Wireless Strategy

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Microwave Fixed Wireless Internet vs. Fiber Optic Cable

Is airFiber the right choice for your business?

airFiber is a newer technology on the market that serves as an alternative to hard-wired fiber optic cable for businesses looking to go wireless. As more businesses learn about the advantages of microwave fixed wireless technologies, they may question whether it is the right solution for them. We’ve found in many cases it may be the right choice for many types of buildings—allowing for higher bandwidth needs and improved reliability and performance.

Below, we’ve outlined a comparison of airFiber’s microwave fixed wireless technology and traditional fiber optic cabling (but the best way to determine what’s best for your company is to talk to a professional).

Lower Latency

Fiber optic cabling networks feature more points the connection needs to travel to—decreasing the speed and leading to more processing latency. Microwave fixed wireless technology reduces the number of hops, which can lead to lower end-to-end latency. While it may seem small improvements for individual use, gaining a couple of milliseconds day-over-day, week-over-week can add up to a substantial advantage for businesses. One great benefit of lower latency is for businesses that use VoIP phone systems—results often lead to superior call quality for those businesses.

Reliability

Downtime can be costly for businesses—when there are connectivity issues, it can cause a drop in efficiency and loss of sales. Microwave fixed wireless internet technology is more reliable than fiber optic networks. This mainly stems from the hard-wired version being run underground—leaving the connections susceptible to damage from the elements, animals, accidental destruction, and even vandalism. airFiber’s technology is point-to-point connection so there are fewer elements (just the points of installation) that need to be secure in order for the technology to remain up and running.

Speeds

Microwave fixed wireless internet connection speeds easily meet and exceed fiber optic network speeds (and speeds can be improved even more without a massive overhaul of the cabling or building’s infrastructure).

airFiber gigabit performance ranges from:

  • 2+ Gbps for airFiber AF-5/AF-5U
  • 4+ Gbps for airFiber AF-24
  • 2 Gpbs for airFiber AF-24HD

Installation Requirements

Fiber optic networking can take a lot of time and resources to install (possibly many weeks). airFiber can be installed within four to five days, minimizing downtime for upgrades or delays in construction. Installation is also more affordable, as there is no need for digging or full-building wiring.

Wireless airFiber Installation in the Southwest

Interested in learning more about airFiber and how it could help your business stay ahead? Installation of microwave wireless technology is much more simple and cost-effective than hard wired alternatives.

At Corporate Technology Solutions, we have offices in Tempe and Tucson, but can provide low voltage installation and services throughout Arizona. Contact us today to get started!

Posted in In-Building Wireless on August 25th, 2016 · Comments Off on Microwave Fixed Wireless Internet vs. Fiber Optic Cable

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New Technology Feature: MulteFire

At Corporate Technology Solutions, we are always making sure we’re staying up to date with industry trends and new technology that will help us better serve our clients and provide truly innovative, custom low voltage solutions to businesses in the Southwest. Below, we’ve outlined a new technology recently introduced to the market: MulteFire.

Read on to learn more or call us today to discover how we can help you improve the efficiency and productivity of your business today!

What Is MulteFire?

MulteFire is a relatively new technology from Qualcomm that is an LTE-based technology operated solely in unlicensed spectrum. As a standalone version of LTE Unlicensed (LTE-U), it does not require an “anchor” in licensed spectrum, which helps provide better coverage and higher quality network than other technologies to those that may not have access to unlicensed bands.

Who Benefits from MulteFire’s Technology?

Since users don’t need to have access to a licensed spectrum, the new technology broadens the LTE ecosystem and allows more people to create high quality networks. Broadband Internet service providers, venue owners—think stadiums and arenas—and enterprise businesses can all benefit from the technology and help provide better connectivity to their customers or employees.

For property owners with dense environments—whether you have a lot of employees in your bullpen, see a lot of foot traffic through your mall, or often hear guests complain of slowed cellular service—it provides a better user experience for wireless access for both data-heavy Internet use and making video or voice calls.

Benefits of MulteFire

MulteFire provide LTE-like performance with Wi-Fi-like simplicity:
Nurse Call System

Source: Qualcomm Technologies (https://www.qualcomm.com/news/onq/2015/06/11/introducing-multefire-lte-performance-wi-fi-simplicity )

When Is MulteFire Available?

At the time of this article, Qualcomm Technologies reports that MulteFire will be released depending on the market demand and customer requests. It is currently filing in the FCC’s proceeding related to LTE-U and LAA.

What Is Our Take?

To us, MulteFire is an exciting advancement in technology. At the core of our business, we strive to put our customers’ needs first. As a business owner or property manager, the user experience of guests, employees, and customers in your property is likely your first priority. With increased reliance on connected devices—often more than one per person when you count smart phones, wearable technology, tablets, laptops, etc.—providing an uninterrupted streaming or heavy-data usage experience is important. Your guests and employees may not notice or mention when wireless connection and cellular usage is great—but we know you’ll hear about it when the connection jams up or slows down. Any advancements in technology that would allow us to provide better, stronger, and more reliable wireless connectivity to our clients is a win in our book and we will be following the roll out of MulteFire through the market.

Questions about improving the wireless connectivity and cellular signal in your Southwest building? Give us a call to discuss your needs and how we can provide a customized solution. We operate throughout the Southwest, including Arizona.

Posted in In-Building Wireless on June 20th, 2016 · Comments Off on New Technology Feature: MulteFire

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Why Property Owners Consider Enhanced DAS before Construction Begins

The Long-Term Property Value of Updated Distributed Antenna Systems & Improved Cellular Signal

Before, we’ve blogged about how cellular connectivity and signal strength should be seen by property owners as a utility. Just as employees and tenants come to expect working heating and cooling systems, flowing clean water, and electricity to power their equipment and devices, they also have come to expect reliable network strength.

Because employees, guests, and customers bring their own devices with them almost everywhere they go (whether a smartphone, tablet, or laptop), they not only need but come to expect strong, reliable wireless signal. This changing expectation provides pressure on commercial developers but also allows for equal opportunity to stay ahead of the trends and continue providing a seamless transition from outdoors to in—before construction even begins on your new building.

What Interferes With Cellular Signal?

When constructing a new building, in addition to considering adding enhanced DAS infrastructure, it’s important to keep in mind what exactly causes poor signal strength. We’ve seen increased reliance on glass and heavier insulation in design and construction can hamper network connectivity. We also know that solid concrete structured and other building materials (mesh, pipes, steel, etc.) can contribute to certain areas or corners of the building being unreliable for your tenants.

What Do Building Managers Currently Do?

While it is a growing trend to keep network connectivity needs (which we know are ever increasing) in mind during constructions, it hasn’t always been in the past. Tenants often have to install their own coverage enhancement systems or simply deal with sub-standard cellular service and signal strength.

Considering Wireless Connectivity Before Construction Begins

Business developers or current building managers have increased pressure to make their wireless connectivity (both cellular signal and Wi-Fi) reliable for their employees and customers throughout their entire buildings. Even more than just phones and computers require connectivity these days—from printers to security systems and thermostats to the never-ending release of new “smart” devices.

While retrofitting enhancements can be made, it’s much easier to plan and consider needs from the start (ground up). With any new construction projects, property owners should take DAS (and potential future needs) in to account before the foundation is even laid. With that viewpoint, it will be installed and implemented with the intent to last a life time, rather than causing building owners the headache of upgrading to meet with increasing demands. This can also be a great asset and selling point for interested parties when reselling or even leasing their properties to tenants.

DAS Installation & Service in the Southwest

Corporate Technology Solutions provides full DAS services, from installation and maintenance to design and testing. We have offices in Tempe and Tucson, but can provide turnkey services throughout Arizona. Contact us to get started on improving the wireless signal strength throughout your new building today!

Posted in In-Building Wireless on May 23rd, 2016 · Comments Off on Why Property Owners Consider Enhanced DAS before Construction Begins

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Featured Vendor: Zhone Technologies & GPON Solutions for Billings Public Schools

Looking to upgrade your structured cabling and network connectivity in your building? Read more to find out how one school system saved millions of dollars while increasing reliability and efficiency of their network solutions by choosing to install GPON from one of our premier vendors, Zhone Technologies.

The Need for Integrated GPON Solutions

Billings Public Schools (in Montana) serves 16,000 students across 22 elementary school campuses and manages one of the largest computer networks in the state. With extensive staff and increasing needs for reliable technology and network access in the classrooms, Billings Public Schools required a reliable, cost-effective plan to implement technology upgrades, including the migration from copper wiring to gigabit passive optical network (GPON) fiber.

The Solution with Zhone Technologies

Billings Public Schools replaced all of their failing copper wiring with Zhone Technologies’ FiberLAN cabling to ensure long-term, reliable networking growth as the population of students and faculty grows. They also deployed Zhone’s zNI 2624P and 2608T indoor GPON ONTs in each classroom to support the various video, data, and other Internet needs.

Benefits of GPON for Billings Public Schools

Since improvements to the school system’s network infrastructure:

  • Approximately $3 million was saved on the update of the broadband network by using GPON (instead of traditional category 6 copper)
  • New hire needs were minimized and troubleshooting trips were reduced
  • IT departments have been able to upgrade systems across all of the elementary school campuses in a shorter amount of time
  • Each classroom has reliable, always-on access to the Internet, resulting in fewer disruptions for the teachings and more time spent educating students (with a 25-year warranty)

Read the full case study here:

zhone case study

About Zhone Technologies

Zhone is a global leader in fiber access transformation. They specialize in carrier and enterprise-grade fiber access solutions with a focus on bandwidth never becoming a constraint or problem in the future as technology and demand continue to advance.

To learn more about Zhone Technologies and how they could provide a solution for your business in the Southwest, similar to the success seen above for Billings Public Schools, contact Corporate Technology Solutions. We are an authorized dealer of GPON technologies from Zhone and would be happy to discuss how your needs can be met by our team. 

Advantages of Gigabit Passive Optical Network Fiber

Bandwidth demands in your office or building are likely ever increasing with improvements and upgrades of technology. Don’t let lagging networks slow down your voice or data use. There are many advantages to using GPON fiber for your network solutions—including range, cost, and ease of use—especially when compared to alternatives like copper architecture. In fact:

  • GPON fiber is less costly than copper-based LANs
  • GPON has minimal space requirements and you can reduce costs further by not needing to invest in wiring closets and associate electronics
  • Climate control costs also decrease, as GPON does not need to be as closely regulated when it comes to safe operating temperature
  • Fiber cables are less expensive and easier to install—saving your company money before installation even takes place
  • Businesses typically see fewer system disruptions post-installation of GPON fiber

GPON Installation in the Southwest from Corporate Technology Solutions

As a leader in the fiber optic industry, Corporate Technology Solutions provides expert design, engineering, consulting, and project management for your entire GPON and infrastructure needs. From the initial installation to continued maintenance of your cabling, we work closely with each of our customers to satisfy their unique specific needs and wants while providing our own expert insight to further improve your project.

Ready to get started? Give us a call today to talk about the solutions we can provide, including GPON solutions like those outlined above with Zhone, for you and your company.

Posted in In-Building Wireless on April 25th, 2016 · Comments Off on Featured Vendor: Zhone Technologies & GPON Solutions for Billings Public Schools

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In-Building Wireless Strategies

With over 10 billion devices wirelessly connected in the market today, it’s crucial for building owners to keep up with growing trends and demands for connectivity. Keep in mind that connecting via Wi-Fi or 3G/4G is no longer something people are just doing on the move—over 70 percent of mobile usage is happening indoors. Plus, using a cellular phone does not just mean making a few calls or sending text messages—devices keep pushing the limit on voice and data usage, including allowing constant connectivity for streaming videos and music, sending emails and photos, and other specialized (usage-heavy) apps.

Because employees, guests, and customers bring their own devices with them almost everywhere they go (whether a smartphone, tablet, or laptop), they not only need but come to expect strong, reliable wireless signal. This changing expectation provides pressure on commercial developers but also allows for equal opportunity to stay ahead of the trends and continue providing a seamless transition from outdoors to in.

Below, we’ve outlined strategies that building owners or commercial real estate developers can take to improve in-building connectivity.

Viewing Wireless Connectivity as a Fourth Utility

Business developers or current building managers have increased pressure to make their wireless connectivity (both cellular signal and Wi-Fi) reliable for their employees and customers throughout their entire buildings. Even more than just phones and computers require connectivity these days—from printers to security systems and thermostats to the never-ending release of new “smart” devices.

Understanding that users want full-strength, full-speed dependable wireless communication, one initial strategy for managers is simply a mental shift to viewing wireless connectivity as a fourth utility—in addition to gas, water, and electric. Employees and customers now expect strong signal in an office just as much as they’d expect working sinks and electricity.

With that viewpoint, it will be installed and implemented with the intent to last a life time, rather than causing building owners the headache of upgrading to meet with increasing demands.

Switching from Copper Cabling to Fiber Infrastructure

Fiber cabling, in lieu of copper cabling, has become a growing trend for real estate developers. Fiber allows for cleaner, simpler cabling solutions and provides the capacity for unlimited bandwidth.

Fiber networks (compared to copper):

  • Cost less to install and maintain
  • Suffer less downtime
  • Require less networking hardware
  • Are one-tenth the size and weight of copper
  • Are more readily available than copper (minimizing installation time)

Choosing fiber cabling solutions from the start of construction also reduces cost over time from minimizing necessary and sometimes continuous upgrades of copper systems. Learn more about fiber vs. copper cable structuring »

Infrastructure to Improve In-Building Wireless

While increased use and reliance can put a strain on in-building networks (both Wi-Fi and cellular data), there are other causes that can reduce effectiveness of in-building connectivity. Causes of poor wireless signal throughout your building can include:

  • The number of employees – each employee likely has more than one device connecting online (sometimes even more than five) when you include work and personal cellular phones, desk phones with VoIP, laptops and desktop computers, printers and other office equipment, and even other smart devices like fitness trackers, smart watches, and tablets.
  • Building layout – most buildings include interior spaces that are blocked by thick walls or even mazes of hallways to get from an exterior wall to that particular conference room or office.
  • Building interference – this includes certain metals, wire mesh, piping, insulation materials, surrounding trees and plans, parking garages, and more.

Learn more about designing and installing dependable wireless solutions for businesses »

Using a Single Integrator for All Your Low Voltage Needs

To complete your in-building networking project (whether an upgrade to existing facility or implementation for a new construction development), it’s best to work with one full-service company rather than different contractors or vendors for each need. Instead of hiring multiple companies to handle your low voltage, structured cabling, and in-building wireless solutions, you can reduce time and cost by choosing a turn-key solutions provider.

Full-Service Integrated Low Voltage Solutions

Corporate Technology Solutions is a low voltage company providing turnkey solutions for our customers throughout the Southwest. Growing from a top tier cabling installer, we now specialize in the design and installation of many systems based on our history of voicedatavideo, and fiber optic cabling systems.

Integrated solutions we provide include:

  • DAS (Distributed Antenna Systems)
  • WI-FI systems
  • GPON (Gigabit Passive Optical Networks)
  • A/V
  • Security systems for business
  • Access control system solutions
  • Video surveillance (CCTV)
  • Emergency communication systems
  • Business intercom solutions
  • Paging systems

Ready to get started? Give us a call today to talk about the solutions we can provide for you and your company located in the Southwest.

Posted in Blog, In-Building Wireless on March 15th, 2016 · Comments Off on In-Building Wireless Strategies

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