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GPON Technology Overview and Benefits

GPON Technology Overview and Benefits

As a business owner, you know that time is money. You also know that the faster you can accomplish tasks, the better you perform against your competitors. If your copper-based local area network (LAN) is no longer keeping up with your company’s technology improvements and upgrades, now could be the time to switch to GPON. Here’s what you need to know about this technology and its many benefits.

What is GPON?

Passive optical network, or PON, has been around since the mid-90s. Gigabit passive optical network, or GPON, is the next evolution in this technology.

PON and GPON use fiber optics to create a point-to-multipoint network, granting individual users all-fiber access to any Ethernet end-point. User devices, access points, wireless controllers, and application servers can all utilize a passive optical network. Many business owners view GPON as the superior choice for voice and data cabling, and as a result, it has become one of the most popular cabling systems in America.

Here’s a summary of how GPON works:

  • Optical line terminals (OLT) convert signals into light.
  • Single-mode fiber carries the light signal incredibly quickly over long distances if necessary. A splitter divides a single optical fiber into separate strands when needed.
  • An optical network terminal (ONT) converts the light back to a standard Ethernet connection to deliver data to end users.

Benefits of GPON

Consider switching from your outdated copper infrastructure to more advanced GPON and enjoy these benefits:

  • Greater range: Single-mode fiber, like the kind used in GPON systems, can transmit data over 10 to 20 kilometers. On the other hand, conventional copper is typically limited to a range of 100 meters.
  • Faster speeds: Fiber optics provides high-performance bandwidth of 5 gigabits per second (Gbps) downstream and 25 Gbps up to the hub. For larger businesses, scalability enables you to provide a seamless path up to 40 Gbps without upgrading the cabling. Such speeds are inconceivable for copper wires, especially over a great distance.
  • Space-saving benefits: GPON fiber is a fraction of the size of traditional copper cables, meaning less space is required to run the cabling through your building. Also, thanks to the extended signal reach, you don’t need as much signal-boosting equipment. As a result, you can install fewer server rooms and equipment to sustain your business’s network requirements.
  • Lower cost: Fiber optic GPON cables are less expensive than copper-based LAN cables. You can also increase your long-term savings by avoiding the need to invest in wiring closets and associated electronics. A comparative study of PON vs. copper Ethernet LAN conducted by Nokia Bell Labs Consulting found that businesses experience a 20 to 60 percent decrease in total cost of ownership after five years.
  • Flexible infrastructure capacity: With a single network, you can achieve full coverage for voice, data, surveillance cameras, Wi-Fi backhaul, and other network functions required to conduct business.
  • Environmentally friendly: As a more efficient and powerful technology for your building, you can consider GPON a step in the right direction. It requires considerably fewer active components to remain up and running, and it doesn’t have strict operating temperature requirements. This means your business uses less electricity and air conditioning when you switch to GPON.

Install GPON in Your Southwest Business

Don’t let lagging network speeds slow down your voice and data signals! Keep up with your competitors by using GPON as a fast, efficient network solution. To hire cabling contractors to install GPON infrastructure in your building, please contact Corporate Technology Solutions today. Our offices in Phoenix, Tempe, Tucson, and Salt Lake City allow us to serve businesses throughout the Southwest.

This entry was posted on Thursday, May 17th, 2018 at 9:29 pm and is filed under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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